HALLMARK THEOLOGY: Another Way God Answers Prayer   

[When I was in college seminary, we students sometimes made snide comments about “Hallmark Theology,” which was something easy to understand, syruppy sweet, memorable, and small enough to fit on a greeting card. Now that I am older, wiser, and a lot less cynical, I actually enjoy some hallmark theology. Of course, as with choosing greeting cards, time and care are needed in the selection process.

This is yet another nice thought by Anonymous who is sometimes referred to by his first and middle names — Author Unknown. Since we don’t know who wrote it, the message gets gets all our focus. And, as always, what means nothing to one might speak volumes to another.]

Prayer of an Unknown Confederate Soldier

I asked God for strength that I might achieve.
I was made weak that I might learn humbly to obey.

I asked for health that I might do greater things.
I was given infirmity that I might do better things.

I asked for riches that I might be happy.
I was given poverty that I might be wise.

I asked for power that I might have the praise of others.
I was given weakness that I might feel the need of God.

I asked for all things that I might enjoy life.
I was given life that I might enjoy all things.

I got nothing that I asked for, but everything I hoped for.
Almost despite myself, my unspoken prayers were answered.

I am, among all people, most richly blessed.

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About Paul Wharton

I am a cradle Catholic, a native West Virginian, and a priest since April 24, 1982. Spiritual Direction has made a tremendous difference in my life and I encourage people to try it out. My motto is "Progress not perfection." I am grateful that God has done for me what I could not do for myself.
This entry was posted in Prayer, Songs and Poetry, Wisdom. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to HALLMARK THEOLOGY: Another Way God Answers Prayer   

  1. Fr. Eric Hall says:

    I used this during my first Mass as a deacon, at which I preached. The reverberations are still felt in my heart today. As I got to the line about infirmities I noticed a family friend who had travelled to Wheeling for my ordination and who had struggled for years with MS. She was one of the most pleasant people I’ve known, and she wore a smile nearly always. In spite of, or perhaps because of her infirmities, she imaged a beautiful faith in which trusted completely in God. I am so thankful that I have so many people that show God’s face to me every day.

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