Glory to God for All Things: An Akathist – Part 8   

[“This Akathist, also called the “Akathist of Thanksgiving,” was composed by Metropolitan Tryphon (Prince Boris Petrovich Turkestanov) in 1934.  A copy was in possession of Protopresbyter Gregory Petrov shortly before his death in a prison camp in 1940. Suggestion: Light a candle in a silent room.  Make the Sign of the Cross, and slowly pray the words aloud, take time to reflect on them, and make them your own.  Revisit these words this Wednesday as well as next Sunday and Wednesday.   Part 9 will be on Sunday October 28, 2012]

ODE 8

How near You are in the day of sickness.
You Yourself visit the sick.
You Yourself bend over the sufferer’s bed;
his heart speaks to You.
In the throes of sorrow and suffering,
You bring peace; You bring unexpected consolation.
You are the Comforter.
You are the Love which watches over and heals us.
To You we sing the song: Alleluia!

IKOS 8

When in my childhood I called upon You consciously for the first time,
You heard my prayer; You filled my heart with the blessing of peace.
At that moment I knew Your goodness,
knew how blessed are those who turn to You.
I started to call upon You, night and day, and even now, I call upon Your Name:

Glory to You, satisfying my desires with good things.
Glory to You, watching over me day and night.
Glory to You, curing affliction and emptiness with the healing flow of time.
Glory to You; no loss is irreparable in You, giver of eternal life to all.
Glory to You, making immortal all that is lofty and good.
Glory to You, promising us the longed-for meeting
with our loved ones who have died.
Glory to You, O God, from age to age.

[One of the many gifts of the Orthodox as well as Eastern Catholic Churches to the rest of Christianity is their great tradition and collection of akathists.    “An akathist (Greek, akathistos) is a hymn dedicated to a saint, holy event, or one of the persons of the Holy Trinity. The word akathist itself means ‘not sitting.'” These hymns are so long they are rarely sung in their entirety any more except in monasteries.  For more information and the source of quotations, please visit http://orthodoxwiki.org/Akathist#Other_languages%5D

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About Paul Wharton

I am a cradle Catholic, a native West Virginian, and a priest since April 24, 1982. Spiritual Direction has made a tremendous difference in my life and I encourage people to try it out. My motto is "Progress not perfection." I am grateful that God has done for me what I could not do for myself.
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