Glory to God for All Things: An Akathist – Part 9   

[“This Akathist, also called the “Akathist of Thanksgiving,” was composed by Metropolitan Tryphon (Prince Boris Petrovich Turkestanov) in 1934.  A copy was in possession of Protopresbyter Gregory Petrov shortly before his death in a prison camp in 1940. Suggestion: Light a candle in a silent room.  Make the Sign of the Cross, and slowly pray the words aloud, take time to reflect on them, and make them your own.  Revisit these words this Wednesday as well as next Sunday and Wednesday.   Part 10 will be on Sunday November 11.]

ODE 9

Why is it that on a feast-day
the whole of nature mysteriously smiles?
Why is it that then a heavenly gladness fills our hearts, a
gladness far beyond that of earth, and
the very air in church and in the altar becomes luminous?
It is the breath of Your gracious love;
it is the reflection of the glory of Mount Tabor.
Then do heaven and earth sing Your praise: Alleluia!

IKOS 9

When You called me to serve my brothers
and filled my soul with humility,
one of Your deep-piercing rays shone into my heart;
it became luminous, full of light,
like iron glowing in the furnace.
I have seen Your face, face of mystery and of unapproachable glory.

Glory to You, transfiguring our lives with deeds of love.
Glory to You, making wonderfully sweet the keeping of Your commandments.
Glory to You, making Yourself known where man shows mercy on his neighbor.
Glory to You, sending us failure and misfortune,
that we may understand the sorrows of others.
Glory to You, rewarding us so well for the good we do.
Glory to You, welcoming the impulse of our heart’s love.
Glory to You, raising to the heights of heaven every act of love in earth and sky.
Glory to You, O God, from age to age.

[One of the many gifts of the Orthodox as well as Eastern Catholic Churches to the rest of Christianity is their great tradition and collection of akathists.    “An akathist (Greek, akathistos) is a hymn dedicated to a saint, holy event, or one of the persons of the Holy Trinity. The word akathist itself means ‘not sitting.'” These hymns are so long they are rarely sung in their entirety any more except in monasteries.  For more information and the source of quotations, please visit http://orthodoxwiki.org/Akathist#Other_languages%5D

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About Paul Wharton

I am a cradle Catholic, a native West Virginian, and a priest since April 24, 1982. Spiritual Direction has made a tremendous difference in my life and I encourage people to try it out. My motto is "Progress not perfection." I am grateful that God has done for me what I could not do for myself.
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