Glory to God for All Things: An Akathist – Part 11   

[“This Akathist, also called the “Akathist of Thanksgiving,” was composed by Metropolitan Tryphon (Prince Boris Petrovich Turkestanov) in 1934.  A copy was in possession of Protopresbyter Gregory Petrov shortly before his death in a prison camp in 1940. Suggestion: Light a candle in a silent room.  Make the Sign of the Cross, and slowly pray the words aloud, take time to reflect on them, and make them your own.  Revisit these words this Wednesday as well as next Sunday and Wednesday.   Part 12 will be on Sunday December 9.]

ODE 11

Across the cold chains of the centuries,
I feel the warmth of Your breath;
I feel Your blood pulsing in my veins.
Part of time has already gone,
but now You are the present.
I stand by Your cross; I was the cause of it.
I cast myself down in the dust before it.
Here is the triumph of love, the victory of salvation.
Here the centuries themselves cannot remain silent,
singing Your praises: Alleluia!

IKOS 11

Blessed are they that will share in the King’s banquet;
but already on earth You give me a foretaste of this blessedness.
How many times with Your own hand
have You held out to me Your Body and Your Blood,
and I, though a miserable sinner, have received this Sacrament,
and have tasted Your love, so ineffable, so heavenly!

Glory to You for the unquenchable fire of Your grace.
Glory to You, building Your Church, a haven of peace in a tortured world.
Glory to You for the life-giving water of baptism in which we find new birth.
Glory to You, restoring to the penitent purity white as the lily.
Glory to you for the Cup of Salvation and the Bread of eternal joy.
Glory to You for exalting us to the highest heaven.
Glory to You, O God, from age to age.

[PHOTO by  veryimportantpigclub on photobucket.com]

[One of the many gifts of the Orthodox as well as Eastern Catholic Churches to the rest of Christianity is their great tradition and collection of akathists.    “An akathist (Greek, akathistos) is a hymn dedicated to a saint, holy event, or one of the persons of the Holy Trinity. The word akathist itself means ‘not sitting.'” These hymns are so long they are rarely sung in their entirety any more except in monasteries.  For more information and the source of quotations, please visit http://orthodoxwiki.org/Akathist#Other_languages%5D

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About Paul Wharton

I am a cradle Catholic, a native West Virginian, and a priest since April 24, 1982. Spiritual Direction has made a tremendous difference in my life and I encourage people to try it out. My motto is "Progress not perfection." I am grateful that God has done for me what I could not do for myself.
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